Bio Saga Headlines

Bio Saga

Wednesday, June 30, 2010

Scientist Position @ National Institute of Plant Genome Research

http://www.nipgr.res.in/careers/vacancies_latest.php





Position for Staff Scientists, MA, Tech. Staff (III), Consultant EngineerJuly 31, 2010


Position for Junior Research FellowJuly 12, 2010


Position for Senior Research Fellow, Technical AssistantJuly 12, 2010


Retired Engineers

Courtesy ISCB-RSG-INDIA








Wednesday, June 23, 2010

Predicting Protein Interaction

Pred_PPI is a web-based system that serves for predicting PPIs from different organisms. This server is freely available to any researcher wishing to use it for non-commercial purposes. Based on auto covariance (AC) and support vector machine (SVM), this tool is capable of predicting PPIs for any target protein pair only using their primary sequences, and assigning an interaction probability to each SVM prediction as well. So the user can use this tool to predict novel PPIs with high confidence.

Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are essential for almost all cellular processes, such as metabolic cycles, DNA transcription and replication, different signaling cascades and so on. However the biochemical methods are all time-consuming and expensive, so current PPI pairs elucidated by experiments are absolutely insufficient compared to the complete PPI networks. Consequently it is increasing important to develop computational tools for effectively identifying PPIs.

Check out this one too - PREDICTING PROTEIN INTERACTION FROM THE GENOME



Body Louse Genome Sequenced

In a paper appearing in the early, online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences yesterday, an international research team reported that they have sequenced the genome of the human body louse, Pediculus humanus humanus.

In the process, the researchers also generated sequence that helped them piece together the genome of a bacterial symbiont residing in the louse. Together, the two genomes are providing clues about louse adaptations to obligate parasitism on the human body. In addition, those involved say the work may ultimately provide insights needed to pave the way for more targeted control measures.

"Understanding the genome should ultimately open up doors to better understanding how to deal with louse populations," co-senior author Barry Pittendrigh, an entomologist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, told GenomeWeb Daily News.

Wednesday, June 16, 2010

CLC Bio along with partners received a $2 million grant from the Danish National Advanced Technology Foundation


CLC Bio today said that it, along with partners Ion Torrent Systems and Aarhus University Hospital, have received a $2 million grant from the Danish National Advanced Technology Foundation to support a molecular diagnostics collaboration.
Under the three-year alliance, the partners aim to develop and integrated hardware and software solution for molecular diagnostics that will utilize high-throughput sequencing. According to CLC Bio, the partners aim to provide faster and more precise DNA-based diagnostics.
Earlier this year, Ion Torrent unveiled its Personal Genome Machine, an electronic sequencer last week that reads DNA on a semiconductor chip by measuring the release of hydrogen ions as nucleotides get incorporated by DNA polymerase. The PGM sequencer is a desktop instrument that will cost only $50,000.
The Ion PGM sequencer does a single run in about an hour or two. The collaboration will lead to an IT solution that can be used for molecular diagnostics research and for clinical diagnostics applications.

Monday, June 14, 2010

Top 100 Cutting-Edge Science Blogs

If you’re a scientist or just a science nut, trying to keep up with the latest in the scientific news and commentary via the internet can be a dizzying task. There are literally tens of thousands of blogs ranging from broad overviews of scientific breakthroughs to in-depth coverage of a specific scientific niche. Here is a list of what is considered to be the top 100 cutting-edge science blogs, arranged by category.

General

These science blogs offer a little bit of everyting.

  1. Science Blog: This blog covers anything and everything science.
  2. SciGuy: Eric Berger provides readers with current events and insightful commentary.
  3. Open Parachute: This blog takes a look at a number of intriguing science topics.
  4. Science Musings: Find out about exciting things happeining in science on this blog.
  5. LiveScience: This multiple-author blog covers everything from the environment to the animal world.
  6. Scientific Frontline Communication Center: Scientific Frontline has everything from weather to space exploration.
  7. The Inoculated Mind: This blog offers an informed look at a variety of science topics.
  8. Wired Science: The science division of wired shares current events in science.
  9. All the Best Bits: This blog attempts to deliver the best of technology, physics, and beyond.

Biology

Check out the latest in the natural world on these blogs.

  1. Biosingularity: Here you’ll find advances in biological systems.
  2. Telic Thoughts: This blog offers thoughts on intelligent design.
  3. blog.bioethics: Find out all about the latest in socially and ethically important biological stories here.
  4. Migrations: Along with discussions on migrations, you’ll find evolution, cell biology, and more.
  5. Biology in Science Fiction: Find out how biology is represented in science fiction in this blog.
  6. The ID Update: Here you’ll find news, commentary, and more on intelligent design.
  7. Animal Science Blog: This blog is all about the scientific side of animals.
  8. Twisted Bacteria: This blog offers an interesting look into natural products, microbiology, and actinomycetes.
  9. Bootstrap Analysis: Follow along with this ecologist’s urban field studies.

Everyday Application

See how science intersects with your life on a daily basis with these blogs.

  1. Tell Me Why?: This blog will satisfy your curiosity.
  2. Science and Reason: This blog attempts to explain science.
  3. The Human Element: Check out this blog to see random experiments with regular people.
  4. Visualizing Science: This blog sees science in real life.
  5. Sorting Out Science: Sorting Out Science attempts to make science interesting for the uninformed.
  6. The Mr Science Show: This blog offers an accessible look at science.
  7. Odd Planet: This blog has strange science news and more from around the world.

Wednesday, June 2, 2010

Search PubMed with the advanced Semantically Annotated Biomedical Search XTractor Lite


Try it! on your websites & Blogs

Voice of The People is the Voice of God!



NIH Seeks Comments on Genetic Testing Registry

The National Institutes of Health wants to hear what the public thinks about its planned Genetic Testing Registry (GTR), which will be a resource of information for healthcare providers and patients to learn about tests and labs, and for researchers and regulators to watch the genetic testing industry.
NIH has opened a 30-day comment period on its GTR project, which will serve as a repository of information about genetic tests submitted by researchers, test developers, and manufacturers. The GTR will include information about how the tests are used, about their validity and utility, and about how they are accessed.
The database, which is expected to be running in 2011, will be overseen by the NIH's Office of the Director, and it will be developed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information.
"The registry will help consumers and health care providers determine the best options for genetic testing, which is becoming more and more common and accessible," NIH Director Francis Collins said in a statement when the program was first unveiled in March 2010.
NIH wants to receive input on the resource from a range of stakeholders including patients, test developers, test kit makers, health care providers, and researchers on the best methods for collecting and displaying information about genetic tests.
In line with recommendations from the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society, NIH in particular wants the registry to include information on the validity and utility of genetic tests.

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

Sandoz to Acquire Oriel Therapeutics

Sandoz has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Oriel Therapeutics, a privately held US pharmaceuticals company, gaining exclusive rights to a portfolio of generic drug candidates and related technologies targeting medicines in the inhalable respiratory drug market. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.


The latter focuses on developing respiratory products with known pathways as generic alternatives to patented drugs for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).


The acquisition provides the former with three development projects targeting leading medicines in this field. Regulatory approvals of these medicines, if achieved, would enable the former to increase access to affordable, quality therapeutic alternatives for these increasingly prevalent diseases. Details of the latter's development programs, including anticipated timing of future regulatory submissions, are not disclosed for competitive reasons.


The acquisition of the latter, which will be integrated as a separate development unit within the former, also offers Sandoz access to FreePath drug delivery technology. This has the potential to address some of the hurdles facing regulatory approval of generic inhaled medicines in the US.

Sandoz to Acquire Oriel Therapeutics

Sandoz has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Oriel Therapeutics, a privately held US pharmaceuticals company, gaining exclusive rights to a portfolio of generic drug candidates and related technologies targeting medicines in the inhalable respiratory drug market. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.



The latter focuses on developing respiratory products with known pathways as generic alternatives to patented drugs for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).



The acquisition provides the former with three development projects targeting leading medicines in this field. Regulatory approvals of these medicines, if achieved, would enable the former to increase access to affordable, quality therapeutic alternatives for these increasingly prevalent diseases. Details of the latter's development programs, including anticipated timing of future regulatory submissions, are not disclosed for competitive reasons.



The acquisition of the latter, which will be integrated as a separate development unit within the former, also offers Sandoz access to FreePath drug delivery technology. This has the potential to address some of the hurdles facing regulatory approval of generic inhaled medicines in the US.

Life Science and Informatics

What is this?
is this a new industry?
or a old wine in a new bottle?

Well Life Sciences and Informatics can be anything form computational biology, all omes and omics, core bioinformatics to curation and literature mining, database creation, in the area of biology, chemistry , bio-chem space.

There are number of companies in India and bangalore is the forefront as a major bio-cluster with 20 to 30 companies in this sphere.

now how good are these companies doing?
how good are they in terms of the international markets and how profitable is their business?
what do they do?
their clients?

These are some interesting things that could be discussed in this blog page...

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